The risk of long COVID is lower with the Omicron type, according to a research conducted in the UK.

Data from the ZOE COVID Symptom study app were analysed by researchers from King’s College London, and their findings were published on Thursday as a letter to the journal ‘The Lancet.’ The researchers found that the odds of experiencing long COVID were between 20 and 50 percent lower during the Omicron period as opposed to the Delta period, depending on age and the amount of time since vaccination.

According to recent findings from studies conducted in the UK, the Omicron variation of COVID-19 has a lower risk of long-term COVID infection compared to the Delta version.

Data from the ZOE COVID Symptom study app were analysed by researchers from King’s College London, and their findings were published on Thursday as a letter to the journal ‘The Lancet.’ The researchers found that the likelihood of experiencing long COVID was between 20 and 50 percent lower during the Omicron period as opposed to the Delta period, depending on the individual’s age and the amount of time that has passed since their last vaccination.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines in the United Kingdom describe long COVID as the presence of new or continuous COVID symptoms four weeks or more following the onset of the disease.

“The Omicron variation appears to be far less likely to cause lengthy COVID than prior versions,” stated the principal author of the study, Dr. Claire Steves from King’s College London. “However, one in 23 persons who get COVID-19 go on to experience symptoms for more than four weeks,” added Dr. Steves.

She stated, “Given the numbers of individuals affected, it is crucial that we continue to help them at work, at home, and within the NHS.”

It is believed that long-term symptoms of COVID, such as weariness, shortness of breath, lack of attention, and joint discomfort, have a negative impact on day-to-day activities and, in some circumstances, can be quite restricting.

According to surveys of patients, a wide variety of other symptoms may also be present, including issues with the digestive tract, sleeplessness, and decline in eyesight.

The findings presented this week are based on the findings of the first study that has been subjected to peer review to report on long COVID risk and the Omicron variant.

King’s College London looked at the instances of 56,003 British adults who were infected between December 2021 and March of this year, during the time when Omicron was the predominant strain, and compared them to the cases of 41,361 British adults who were infected while Delta was the predominant strain.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) in the UK discovered that five percent of participants reported at least one long COVID symptom 12 to 16 weeks after a coronavirus infection. This research was conducted in the United Kingdom.

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